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View Full Version : Audio/Visual Entertainment scrapped


delb10
02-16-2009, 03:01 PM
I recently flew from Philadelphia - Las Vegas and back. I was flying 1st class and had brought my own headphones to listen and or watch the entertainment. To my surprise, the flight attendant said that U S Airways had removed the entertainment equipment from most of their flights. I don't like to read on the plane, which made the 4+ hour flight seem much longer. This may not seem like a big deal but just goes to show how poorly the customer is treated at U S Airways

PHXFlyer
02-16-2009, 05:13 PM
US Airways started removing IFE (in-flight entertainment) systems from their domestic aircraft almost as soon as the merger with America West was complete. The stock symbol of the new combined company is LCC which stands for "Low Cost Carrier." Their business model, quite frankly, sucks. They want to retain the "window dressing" of a full-service airline (first-class cabins, membership in Star Alliance) yet stoop to new lows when it comes to cutting costs (advertising on tray tables, charging for water and coffee, removing IFE).

US Airways is not customer friendly. I doubt they'll be in business much longer. I hope whoever picks up their pieces does a better job!

Butch Cassidy Slept Here
02-16-2009, 07:59 PM
As to domestic air travel: If one can go, from Point A, to Point B; arrive within an hour of the scheduled time; within an hour following arrival, get all of one's checked baggage; and not, once, be the recipiant of sarcastic/nasty remarks, threats of arrest, or similiar comments; THEN you've had a FANTASTIC flight!

Some experts have cited Southwest's technique of "lowering expectations" as one, of a few, reasons for its success and decades-long profitability. No first class, no entertainment (unless you bring your own.) A "biggie" would be a "snack box" on a long-haul flight. Indeed, in more than one Southwest advertisement, a photo of a bag of peanuts is featured as the only in-flight "food service."

Regardless of what the information, on-line or over the phone, says one should NEVER assume there will be functioning audio or video entertainment, or even any kind of food service (purchase or otherwise) on board. With all the cut-backs in maintenance, entertainment systems, along with food service equipment, are probably on the bottom of the list of priorities, with safety/FAA-mandated items being first. As to food service: Some cities, usually the major ones, have good catering services. Internationally, a different standard, most likely applies. Major hub cities may have the best catering. Beyond that, it's probably hit or miss.

jimworcs
02-16-2009, 10:17 PM
US Airways is not customer friendly

:eek: Pot, let me introduce you to the kettle

Butch Cassidy Slept Here
02-16-2009, 10:40 PM
If the biggest failing of US Airways, or anyone else, was a problem with their entertainment systems, or their food service, that, in my judgement (and, I think, a LOT of other people including a number of posters on this board) would NOT merit the designation of "...not customer friendly." For one thing, "...not customer friendly" suggests there may be problems with the way all too many staff relate to customers. As I pointed-out, in the above post, Southwest Air has no first class; any kind of entertainment systems, or meaningful food service. Yet Southwest holds a distinction few airlines--in the world--can claim: sustained profitability.

PHXFlyer
02-17-2009, 04:29 AM
If the biggest failing of US Airways, or anyone else, was a problem with their entertainment systems, or their food service, that, in my judgement (and, I think, a LOT of other people including a number of posters on this board) would NOT merit the designation of "...not customer friendly." For one thing, "...not customer friendly" suggests there may be problems with the way all too many staff relate to customers. As I pointed-out, in the above post, Southwest Air has no first class; any kind of entertainment systems, or meaningful food service. Yet Southwest holds a distinction few airlines--in the world--can claim: sustained profitability.

When is the last time you flew US Airways? It's not just the lack of IFE on domestic flights or having to pay for everything including water. The whole experience from check-in to on-board staff is lacking. (Save the heroic efforts of the gentlemen who landed that A320 in the Hudson River. But those were US Airways "East" pilots. A different breed from the former AWA - see my additional comments below.)

US Airways touts themselves as a "full service - low cost" airline. They are neither. At least with Southwest you know what you are paying for. No seat assignments, no first class product, and no IFE. The expectation isn't there in the first place. At least on Southwest you get free soft drinks and snacks.

*Note about the pilots - watch the Dave Letterman interview on CBS.com. Dave reads back a transcript of communications between the pilots and ATC. He asks about the callsign "Cactus." "Cactus" was used as the ATC call sign for America West flights pre-merger and is now used for all US Air flights - both "East" and "West." Watch how the pilot explains, with much disdain in his voice and without alot of detail, what the callsign "Cactus" means!

Butch Cassidy Slept Here
02-17-2009, 05:08 AM
of the reasons you, PHX, stated. As your comments suggest, it is not a single issue but a true "death by a thousand cuts" from the customer's perspective. US Airways lies about being a full-service, low-cost airline might be overlooked if there were significant redeeming traits. But there are NONE! Southwest Air might even be cut some slack if they stretched the truth about their meal service, or lack of it. Who ever heard of bad food service sinking an airline in a post-deregulated world? Southwest has redeeming traits: Lost baggage is at a lower frequency compared to the competition; flight operations bear a reasonable relationship to the printed timetable; and the overwhelming portion of Southwest’s staff are able to treat customers like human beings. Traits like these have almost become the exception, rather than the rule, at Southwest’s competition. Many US-based carriers think a "redeeming trait" is giving a customer 5,000 frequent flyer miles, or a voucher for a free flight, when something goes wrong. The sad reality is these "trinkets" are dispensed against a backdrop of near total disregard for the importance of producing a quality service product. The usage of call centers in India (by United) is a prime example of this mentality. Thus this is not just a US Airways problem, but something common to, perhaps, all of North America with the exception of two or three airlines.