PDA

View Full Version : Canceled / Delayed / Overbooked Airline should take responsibility for this


PraguerCZ
Nov 14, 2014, 11:53 PM
I have worked in travel industry for a long time and usually write positive posts. People turn to me for advice and I am glad to give it. This time, however, I have a major issue with British Airways. This is it:

A passenger books with British Airways a flight from Prague to San Jose Del Cabo - Baja California Mexico. The flight has two segments - Prague - Dallas and Dallas to San Jose Del Cabo - Baja California Mexico. The Mexico segment is served by American Airlines but the trip is booked with and paid to British Airways.

A day before the original flight departs from Prague, unbeknown to the passenger, the Mexican Airport is closed for repairs due to hurricane damage. BA lets the passenger board, knowing that he cannot complete his flight. Even upon the arrival to Dallas, no one notifies the passenger. After scheduled night rest, the passenger arrives to the airport to continue his flight to Mexico. American Airlines counter informs him that he cannot fly for 8 days. (This is a prearranged fishing holiday). They send him to British Airways for resolution. He is offered a paid stay in a hotel for 8 days or a trip back home and since he cannot waste 8 days of his holidays, he returns home.

He writes British Airlines in London a letter asking for a free ticket to repeat this aborted flight. After several weeks he receives
two responses: the British Airways acknowledges his letter without a hint of resolution. Another office form Slovakia writes him the typical denial letter in Slovak language. (You would think that a company engaged in international travel would know that the Czech and Slovak Republics are two different countries and have different
languages).

Now, you would thing that a free ticket for a botched holiday (and saving the BA 8 days full accommodation) is a fair request. Not the British Airways. The offered him a 100 quid voucher. I think that the culpability in this case is clear - squarely in the British Airway lap.

My advice to him and all my readers is: Do not let British Airways bully you - they rely on you getting tired and dropping your
case.. For example, in one recent dispute, the BA customer went to promoted Twitter posts and won. In the age of social networks, ignoring valid complaints may cost British Airways much more than a
free return flight.

A320FAN
Nov 16, 2014, 6:19 PM
I have worked in travel industry for a long time and usually write positive posts. People turn to me for advice and I am glad to give it. This time, however, I have a major issue with British Airways. This is it:

A passenger books with British Airways a flight from Prague to San Jose Del Cabo - Baja California Mexico. The flight has two segments - Prague - Dallas and Dallas to San Jose Del Cabo - Baja California Mexico. The Mexico segment is served by American Airlines but the trip is booked with and paid to British Airways.

A day before the original flight departs from Prague, unbeknown to the passenger, the Mexican Airport is closed for repairs due to hurricane damage. BA lets the passenger board, knowing that he cannot complete his flight. Even upon the arrival to Dallas, no one notifies the passenger. After scheduled night rest, the passenger arrives to the airport to continue his flight to Mexico. American Airlines counter informs him that he cannot fly for 8 days. (This is a prearranged fishing holiday). They send him to British Airways for resolution. He is offered a paid stay in a hotel for 8 days or a trip back home and since he cannot waste 8 days of his holidays, he returns home.

He writes British Airlines in London a letter asking for a free ticket to repeat this aborted flight. After several weeks he receives
two responses: the British Airways acknowledges his letter without a hint of resolution. Another office form Slovakia writes him the typical denial letter in Slovak language. (You would think that a company engaged in international travel would know that the Czech and Slovak Republics are two different countries and have different
languages).

Now, you would thing that a free ticket for a botched holiday (and saving the BA 8 days full accommodation) is a fair request. Not the British Airways. The offered him a 100 quid voucher. I think that the culpability in this case is clear - squarely in the British Airway lap.

My advice to him and all my readers is: Do not let British Airways bully you - they rely on you getting tired and dropping your
case.. For example, in one recent dispute, the BA customer went to promoted Twitter posts and won. In the age of social networks, ignoring valid complaints may cost British Airways much more than a
free return flight.

A.) Acts of Mother nature are not covered in the USA.
B.) Since everything according to your letter looks to be a single ticketed
itinerary, AA did the correct thing in offering what was available or
referring him back to BA.
C.) No a free ticket is not a reasonable request. The most he should get back is a refund for the unused portion of the air itinerary with out CXL penalties.
D.) Watch BBC global new service with world wide weather, and check all applicable weather websites before going next time

PraguerCZ
Nov 16, 2014, 6:35 PM
You did read the entire post, right? The "Act of Nature" happened a day before the pax boarded - that is the Airline knew they are sending him to a dead airport. Is it difficult to understand this?

In addition, the passenger is pursuing this in UK, not in the USA.

Actually, it is almost impertinent to tell me to watch there news before I travel. What if I do not have TV or internet?

What you are saying is that BA knowingly misused the un-informed passenger - knowing that he cannot get to the final destination and knowing (according to you) that he has no recourse. Really very ethical.

We will see what the social networks and media have to say about this.

stonecold_1981
Nov 17, 2014, 8:57 PM
A320Fan - your response is off-point. Given the OP's note, it seems like the situation in Mexico was/had already occurred before the passenger started the first leg of the journey. Had the passenger booked directly via AA, s/he would have been notified of the connection issue and had the opportunity not to start the journey. Obviously, because of (somewhat non-transparent) way in which codeshare flights are handled, the passenger ended up losing the day of travel.

I don't think an entire roundtrip compensation is required here but the ticketing airline does have additional responsibility.