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Baggage Problems
COMPLAINT: Items stolen from GATE CHECKED baggage

 
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  #1  
Old Jun 1, 2009, 11:43 PM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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I am a Premier member on United, having flown them for years without issue. I have even had luggage lost on prior occasions, returned to me without any problem whatsoever...until last Wednesday.
I was forced to gate check a bag on Wednesday at PHL due to a lack of overhead space. My bag was checked planeside, and we departed for ORD within minutes. Upon my return home, I found that my medication, purse (consolidated per TSA regulations- but thankfully my wallet and cell were not in there) were gone. The thief that UA employs was kind enough to remove my work ID, though, from my purse and leave it in my suitcase.
Yes, I called. Filed a claim via fax (which they claim to not have received), even went back to ORD and met with Baggage Services personally. Everyone tells me that Customer Relations will be reaching out, but I have yet to hear from anyone.
I will say, though, that the theft is only part of my concern. If United's areas are so insecure that rampant theft can occur, then why can't someone with intent plant something like an explosive devise in a checked bag and put it onto an aircraft? Does the union protect its membership to the degree that it won't allow locker checks or demands of clear plastic purses of its employees to protect against such theft?
As passengers, we deserve a level of protection- for ourselves and our belongings. My loses with United ended with this flight. I won't risk my life to fly an unsecured airline. I feel horrible about sending my parents on a United flight to Italy with some of my miles this spring. Had I only known that I could have placed their lives in jeopardy, I would have never done it.
I will tell you, though, that I am not done...no one on this board should be done. We deserve better. I filed a police report with the Chicago Police Dept., a security issues report with the TSA, and a complaint with the DOT. And no...I am not done yet. Just today I read an article about a delayed UA passenger that was impressed he had received an automated email from United apologizing for the delay...with a choice of three apology gifts!! I will tell you, United, because I know someone in your Marketing group reads these boards from time to time, that if you have the resources for these sorts of touchy-feely proactive service initiatives, you certainly have the resources to place cameras in all of your baggage handling facilities and expedite claims from your customers who made the mistake of trusting you with their belongings (sometimes, as in my case, against our will).
I have flown United for years and would proactively recommend (even defend) you. None of that mattered to you...I am still waiting on a call from Customer Relations that I was supposed to get the very next day from you. If you do read this, please don't bother calling me after June 5. I will be enjoying a nice beach vacation that I decided to book...ON ANOTHER AIRLINE.
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  #2  
Old Jun 2, 2009, 4:04 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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Anyone who steals from bags should be hung by, uh, well let's not go there.

However, if you think that this level of security is only at United, then be prepared to never fly on any airline. As far as getting stuff on the plane, yes I suppose it's possible, but there is the issue of getting the item out there to start with. We won't go into that. But if you think about it, where do you think they rummaged through your stuff? Probably in the cargo bin in Philly. Could have been at the baggage claim in chicago, but the cargo bin would provide the most cover. So now you are talking about installing cameras in every cargo hold. This has been done on a limited basis, but it leads to other problems.

The biggest problem in this case is Philly. That airport is probably by far the worst of any airport in the country for items missing from bags. In fact, there was a time when my airline had one particular flight everyday that had by far the highest number of pilferage claims of any of our flights. They finally caught the guys, but thieves are quite crafty.

If United doesn't act quickly on your claim, call the news. However don't expect much too soon as far as who took the items. This takes time. And locker checks are not the answer. That is already in place. The problem is these guys usually end up taking the items to some hiding place, not their locker. There was a case where I worked that actually turned out to be a couple of the baggage delivery guys. They have to park in the parking garage, which is above the terminal building. Long story short, in the stairwells, are another set of stairs - something about they were used when the airport was being built, but not in normal use today. In fact they have these little half height doors. Anyway, the police found the stuff they were taking in the side stairwells.

The point is there is much more to the issue of pilferage than you would think.
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  #3  
Old Jun 2, 2009, 10:16 AM
Corbel Corbel is offline
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you should also file a missing items claim with the TSA, they also have hold of your bags and even though at times they search the inside of bags they do seem to forget to put the paper in there. but as jetliner said...if you think this only happens at UA, you may as well never fly again. it happens at most if not all airlines. another oops on your part was checking your meds. (if i am reading that correctly)
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  #4  
Old Jun 2, 2009, 12:26 PM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Corbel View Post
you should also file a missing items claim with the TSA, they also have hold of your bags and even though at times they search the inside of bags they do seem to forget to put the paper in there. but as jetliner said...if you think this only happens at UA, you may as well never fly again. it happens at most if not all airlines. another oops on your part was checking your meds. (if i am reading that correctly)
Corbel, the bag in question here was gate checked. TSA inspected it as a carryon during the passenger screening process.
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  #5  
Old Jun 2, 2009, 10:42 PM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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All:

First off, thank you for your kind insight and replies. I really appreciate it!

Secondly, I have tagged PHL as well to be on the safe side, though I don't believe the theft occurred in Philly. I was one of the last on board this particular flight. We taxied within minutes of boarding. While the baggage canopy may have typically afforded some cover, I struggle with the two baggage handlers having time and opportunity to steal my purse in the time allotted- especially since the thief in question left my work badge back in my roll-aboard (which was previously in my purse).

While I strongly believe that ORD had better opportunity to steal my belongings than PHL based on this particular situation, I am in no way naive with regard to the potential of this occurring on any airline I fly. In fact, when I intentionally check bags (as opposed to being forced to, as in this case) I never have anything of value in a checked bag.

But you do start to wonder about the possibility of what could happen when security is not as tight as it should be. I doubt anyone would believe that boxcutters could serve as the weapon of choice to bring down 4 airplanes before Sept. 11. If there is an opportunity, people with intent will expose that opportunity. And if there is a dishonest employee that will not hesitate to steal a passenger belongings, I would propose that same employee may not hesitate to insert something into a bag for the right money (perhaps a package that ticks, or a package of narcotics, etc.).

Ultimately, there are dishonest employees in every industry. But employers- such as United- have a direct responsibility to protect its assets and its customers. It is simply unacceptable to be fully aware that this situation happens and not take every possible precaution against this sort of exposure. If theft was not rampant, there would be no need to have a process, forms, and even a category ("pilferage reports") to manage the situation.

If this were a banking scenario, for example, the outcome would be far different. If I deposited $500 at an ATM and the bank only credited $250, the call from the customer would engage immediate and swift measures. Tapes would be reviewed right away. All employees on staff would be questioned (even though only certain employees with password access can even get at the ATM deposits) and the employee would be terminated. The employee would then be arrested on the spot for theft. And finally, the bank would credit the money to the customer. This in hours or days at most- not weeks.

What I don't understand is why it has to take this long. Whether at ORD or PHL, United knows who was on duty and who worked that flight. Why not act like a bank does- swiftly- to start the investigation? Why have your customer be burdened with the obligation to resolve the matter your employees caused?

See, I disagree that this is not a security issue. If the airline is apathetic, it is not vigilantly ensuring its passengers' safety. I can't prove that other airlines aren't as apathetic, but I have proof that United is.
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  #6  
Old Jun 2, 2009, 11:27 PM
azstar azstar is offline
 
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This is a very difficult thing to prove. You would lose in a Court of Law since you have no proof who stole this. There would have to be witnesses who would testify. A bank teller is a different situation. Tellers are responsible for a fixed amount of currency. If they come up short on more than one occasion they can be held accountable.
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  #7  
Old Jun 3, 2009, 3:18 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
If theft was not rampant, there would be no need to have a process, forms, and even a category ("pilferage reports") to manage the situation.
This does not mean that it's rampant. EVERY airline in the world has a pilferage procedure and claims process.

Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
What I don't understand is why it has to take this long. Whether at ORD or PHL, United knows who was on duty and who worked that flight. Why not act like a bank does- swiftly- to start the investigation?
Oh they will investigate, but who do they look at? Even checking in at the gate, your bag could have been handled by 6 or 8 different people. All they can do is look for patterns to be able to narrow it down. As I said, tracking down thieves is a lot more complicated than you think.
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  #8  
Old Jun 3, 2009, 5:18 AM
Butch Cassidy Slept Here Butch Cassidy Slept Here is offline
 
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From Jetliner: This does not mean that it's (theft is) rampant.

OK, perhaps the statistics can't support the contention that theft is rampant. Although when the wages of baggage handlers are considered isn't it being just a bit naive to assume theft is not a significant issue? Also when theft is added into the figures for baggage that is lost (aren't theft, and outright loss, pretty much the same thing?) do you, now, agree that theft, when combined with outright loss, is a significant issue? Or, does this, to you, remain something petty?

As to the stats for theft and loss: The stats can't reflect the numbers of people who...
Did not file a report because the line at the baggage service desk was too long.
Filed a report which was subsequently "trashed" by baggage service staff
Were unable to file a report because of hostile baggage service staff and/or unwarranted
intervention by airport police.
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  #9  
Old Jun 4, 2009, 12:10 AM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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Originally Posted by azstar View Post
This is a very difficult thing to prove. You would lose in a Court of Law since you have no proof who stole this. There would have to be witnesses who would testify. A bank teller is a different situation. Tellers are responsible for a fixed amount of currency. If they come up short on more than one occasion they can be held accountable.
In the example I used (an ATM), the teller is not accountable for a set amount of currency. You don't deposit your money into an ATM one twenty at a time so that the machine can verify the total deposit against what you entered in on the keypad. That is why cameras and dual processes are used.

But you unintentionally hit on something important to back my point. At a time when technology can trace a parcel from the sender through various distribution centers to its final destination, with the ability to relay the signature of the person who received that package and the time and date of its arrival, am I to understand that the same technology can't be applied in airline baggage for both security and anti-theft measures? Of course it can. All luggage has bar codes, but do handlers have equipment that identifies that they were the ones who took the baggage off the plane?

We have RFID technology (radio frequency identifier) that can tell Wal-Mart that you purchased an exact brand of shaving cream, trigger an order at the distribution center to ship a replacement and tie it to customized marketing campaigns back to you when you pay with a credit card. But we can have areas in airports where luggage can be pilfered undetected? How does a baggage handler even leave a secure area with more than what he/she came in with? You would think reverse security (checking them when they leave) should be enacted.

I don't believe that the process or resource constraints is preventing these additional security measures from implementation nationwide. It is simply a matter of money. As passengers, we are obligated (by law) to comply with TSA regulations, even if changes are made on the fly (such as now having your shoes on the conveyer belt directly or in a bin alone through security). How are passengers the potential enemy but employees can commit criminal activity and we are to deal with it?

Honestly, this would not be tolerated in any other industry. If your cleaning lady stole something from your house, would you not be enraged? Of course. Would you press charges? Yep. And of course you would fire the agency that sent her, because they must not screen or supervise their employees well enough to ensure your security.

Would you allow the mechanic that is changing the oil in your car's engine to break into your glove box and steal your GPS? Is it justified for him to do so simply because you were brazen enough to keep a GPS in your car? Of course not. He or she is wrong to do it because stealing is wrong.

But the company is wrong when they are aware that the problem exists and take no additional action to prevent such issues. When it is so widely known that these issues could exist, and yet nothing fundamentally changes, there is a problem. There has to be an element of trust when you fly- I trust that the pilot is competent to fly the plane and that the attendants are trained to assist me in an emergency. I trust that the gate agents are expediting boarding processes in the best manner possible. And yes, I trust that baggage handlers are handling my baggage and not sifting through it. I don't accept that I am naive in expecting that level of trust. I believe we are all entitled to that level of trust and respect as customers.

I don't think one incident of theft is any better than thousands, frankly. I think any security breach, regardless of what side of the gate it occurs upon, is appalling. We would not accept this in any other industry- I won't accept that it is my fault as a passenger for what happened to me; particularly when I was forced to gate check my bag in the first place.

Finally, with regard to "a difficult thing to prove", I don't think so. I had a travel companion with me that saw me consolidate my purse into my roll-aboard to meet TSA regulations (who has already provided me with a sworn statement). I clearly gate checked my bag, because I have the claim tag. There are employee logs and it should be very easy to determine who worked the baggage for that flight at both PHL and ORD. Interview them all. Frankly, interrogate them all. Review the tapes and question any irregularities or variances to established process. Make it what it is- a criminal investigation.

Regardless, I can tell you what I CAN absolutely prove to a jury- I had property in my roll-aboard that was not there when I picked it up. If you claim I would have difficulty in finding out exactly who did it, fine. United did it, because they are responsible for all its employees and their actions. Period.
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  #10  
Old Jun 5, 2009, 6:05 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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Originally Posted by Butch Cassidy Slept Here View Post
From Jetliner: This does not mean that it's (theft is) rampant.

[B][COLOR=black][FONT='Arial Narrow']OK, perhaps the statistics can't support the contention that theft is rampant. Although when the wages of baggage handlers are considered isn't it being just a bit naive to assume theft is not a significant issue?
Where did I say it wasn't a significant issue? The OP said that because there is a process, forms and a category. I'm saying just because they have all of this does not mean it's rampant. Pilferage overall accounts for a very very small number of claims. But if the airline has only 1 pilferage happen in an entire month or even an entire year, there still has to be forms, procedures and a category for this.
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  #11  
Old Jun 5, 2009, 6:25 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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OK< you really don't understand how things work.

Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
But you unintentionally hit on something important to back my point. At a time when technology can trace a parcel from the sender through various distribution centers to its final destination, with the ability to relay the signature of the person who received that package and the time and date of its arrival, am I to understand that the same technology can't be applied in airline baggage for both security and anti-theft measures? Of course it can. All luggage has bar codes, but do handlers have equipment that identifies that they were the ones who took the baggage off the plane?
We already know who worked what flight. We already know who the transfer drivers are. And the problem is if something is missing, any one of them could have been the one responsible. Even from your own comments you don't know what city it actually happened in. Right off, neither does the airline.

Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
But we can have areas in airports where luggage can be pilfered undetected? How does a baggage handler even leave a secure area with more than what he/she came in with? You would think reverse security (checking them when they leave) should be enacted.
Most pilferage seems to happen in the cargo compartments. As for the reverse security think about what you are saying. You are talking about having to make a list of everything each person had with them coming in, then comparing that list to when they left, and doing that for several thousand employees. There is no possible way for this to work.

Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
If your cleaning lady stole something from your house, would you not be enraged? Of course. Would you press charges?
And when the airline catches these thieves they are prosecuted. But again, you have to find them first. In the case of your cleaning lady, you know who it was. There is only one possible person.

There was a case a few years ago at a major airline's hub, where they busted several guys stealing form bags. When the police arrested them, they paraded them through the different ramp breakrooms (in handcuffs).

There have also been pilferage cases where the airline (once they pin down the city) has hired an undercover officer as a ramp agent. It's usually a matter of a couple days and the problem is hauled off in cuffs.

Here's the bottom line. We can debate this issue until all of our fingers bleed on our keyboards, but the fact is this is more difficult to deal with than you think. There is also a lot that you as the passenger don't know about that goes on behind the scenes to deal with this, and to stop it, and to try to prevent it. But going back to your Wal-Mart examples, there are cases where employees steal from stores. And right under the watchful eye of cameras and security teams.
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  #12  
Old Jun 5, 2009, 6:43 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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Hey Butch, before you try to squeeze in your garbage bashing of airline employees, why don't you think about your post first.

Originally Posted by Butch Cassidy Slept Here View Post
Did not file a report because the line at the baggage service desk was too long.
Except that 99.9% of claims are done via phone. People don't unpack at the airport. And don't come back with some crap about not answering the phones, since the only way the people know how to get in touch with the office is by calling the reservations line. Yes, they do get through to the office.

Originally Posted by Butch Cassidy Slept Here View Post
Filed a report which was subsequently "trashed" by baggage service staff
It's not possible for an agent to trash a computer file.

Originally Posted by Butch Cassidy Slept Here View Post
Were unable to file a report because of hostile baggage service staff and/or unwarranted
Refer to #1.

I;m sure there's people that don't report items missing, but if it's of any value they sure will. The airlines also get calls of a missing shoe, or something similar. Usually turns out it was in an unsecured side pocket or the TSA dropped it during physical inspection, etc. Here's a good one - I actually had a couple cases where someone gained an item. Never was anything of value. The only logic we could ever put behind this was the TSA was checking two bags too close to each other and got an item mixed up.
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  #13  
Old Jun 11, 2009, 12:53 PM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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Most pilferage seems to happen in the cargo compartments. As for the reverse security think about what you are saying. You are talking about having to make a list of everything each person had with them coming in, then comparing that list to when they left, and doing that for several thousand employees. There is no possible way for this to work.


First off, I do appreciate your insightful comments (absolutely sincere).

My mom worked at Sony for years. She was not allowed to enter with a purse, tote, or anything other than a completely transparent bag for her belongings. She went through a metal detector and security on the way out of the building as well as on the way in. Why? Easy. Sony did not want any of its products walking out the door with its employees.

Many retail environments (particularly higher-end stores) operate on the same principal. Essentially, the thought is that if there is no where to hide anything, there is a far less chance of something leaving the store.

This is why I am so bothered by the baggage handling issues. See, to me anyway, the security issue is one that should not be compromised. I need to take off flip-flops, for Pete's sake, and walk through a metal detector barefoot. We have airports that are implementing full-body screening for passengers (with undies outlined et al). Every airport has cameras in every station except the bathrooms (and I am not so sure there aren't cameras there as well somewhere) to protect against threats and secure our safety, right? So if we go through all of these things as passengers, no matter how ridiculous, why is it a stretch for the airlines (and I'll say it- the unions) to implement measures to ensure the same level of security on the other side of the airport?

Jetliner, I don't believe that it needs to be as complicated as you suggest. I believe some simple measures, such as cameras, random employee searches (like we have as passengers) and the see-through purse notion mentioned above would significantly reduce pilferage because the chances of getting caught would increase. Can you prevent all of it? Maybe not- but if you can take measures to ensure that you are preventing as much as you can, it restores faith in the company and ensures our overall security.
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  #14  
Old Jun 11, 2009, 9:18 PM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
This is why I am so bothered by the baggage handling issues. See, to me anyway, the security issue is one that should not be compromised. I need to take off flip-flops, for Pete's sake, and walk through a metal detector barefoot. We have airports that are implementing full-body screening for passengers (with undies outlined et al). Every airport has cameras in every station except the bathrooms (and I am not so sure there aren't cameras there as well somewhere) to protect against threats and secure our safety, right? So if we go through all of these things as passengers, no matter how ridiculous, why is it a stretch for the airlines (and I'll say it- the unions) to implement measures to ensure the same level of security on the other side of the airport?
Airline and airport employees absolutely do go through TSA screening if they work on the sterile side. In many airports the employees have their own TSA checkpoint which is not in the public area. Here in Phoenix terminal two doesn't have a dedicated employee checkpoint so I often see employees going through security with the rest of the passengers. Once I was behind a guy who was re-stocking one of the shops behind security. All of the items he was bringing in, newspapers, magazines, candy, etc., were x-rayd. I jokingly pointed out to one of the screeners that the bottled water was larger than 3 ounces. The TSA employee didn't think it was very funny!
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  #15  
Old Jun 12, 2009, 12:02 AM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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I know airline employees are screened before entering those areas, but are they screened coming out of those areas?

Cashiers need to count down their drawers, for example, and reconcile before they leave (and if they are off, they are disciplined- even fired). Truckers have a bill of lading that needs to be reconciled with the delivered load. While you can't eliminate all theft, if baggage pilferage happens with the apparent frequency seen on this board and others then I'd argue that not enough security and supervision exists to minimize any exposure.
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Old Jun 13, 2009, 7:13 AM
Jetliner Jetliner is offline
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Screened how upon leaving? Again, they would have to log every item the employee had going in, and compare it to what they had going out. It's not at all unusual for an employee to have an ipod or camera or even a laptop with them or other similar items. So if they have that item when they leave, how would a screener know if they had it when they arrived or if the stole it. The only possible way would be to catalog everything they brought in. You said one of your missing items was a purse. If there was screening on the way out, if a female ramp agent was leaving, how would the screener know it wasn't hers rather than stolen?

As I said before, I don't think you realize exactly what you are talking about here.
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  #17  
Old Jun 14, 2009, 12:05 PM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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Or, Jetliner, you can have rules that limit what an employee brings in with them. Why would a baggage handler have need for a camera or a laptop while on the job? I would think even an ipod would be useless, even dangerous, if used on the job.

Now, if they want to use those items on lunch break, for example, then fine. Those items can be left in a secured area where the employee does sign them in and out. Ever served jury duty? The same process applies.

No need to log anything in- just turn in what you have and return same to that secured area (on the OTHER side of security in the PUBLIC area of the airport) when done.

I am sure it seems like a hassle. But so is getting something stolen from your bag. I think the hassle can be shared in the name of security.
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Old Jun 14, 2009, 10:20 PM
Suga00 Suga00 is offline
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Originally Posted by Inkedadeal View Post
Or, Jetliner, you can have rules that limit what an employee brings in with them. Why would a baggage handler have need for a camera or a laptop while on the job? I would think even an ipod would be useless, even dangerous, if used on the job.

Now, if they want to use those items on lunch break, for example, then fine. Those items can be left in a secured area where the employee does sign them in and out. Ever served jury duty? The same process applies.

No need to log anything in- just turn in what you have and return same to that secured area (on the OTHER side of security in the PUBLIC area of the airport) when done.

I am sure it seems like a hassle. But so is getting something stolen from your bag. I think the hassle can be shared in the name of security.


Most break rooms are on the inside of security and there are no separate lines for security where I worked for employees. Now we had 30 min. breaks which now means we would have to wait on the line in the food court to get food (with the passengers) then exit security, go to the "secure area" where their holding our personal items, sign out the cell phone, ipod, laptop, whatever the case may be, (and many people have breaks at the same time so there will be a line) find somewhere else to eat (since our break room & food court was inside security) and still have time to run back through security and maybe use the bathroom on the way. Sounds quick? Try that on a Friday afternoon in the summer at JFK, or any major airport.


Also, our break rooms didn't have cameras someone actually broke into a co-workers locker and stole his laptop while we were working, and the airline still refused to put in a camera in the break room, so we keep our things on us. This would have to apply to ramp workers as well as gate agents, since anyone could walk down the steps on the side of the aircraft and open a bag if they really wanted to, I'm sure when you have down time at work and you have nothing to do you pick up your phone and call someone, check up on your kids, whatever the case maybe, well we do it to. Sounds good for jury duty, not for hundreds of employees in the same terminal.

I think there should be more cameras in the baggage areas but that would mean every nook and cranny would have to have a camera and most airlines, I know the one I worked for wouldn't go for that.
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  #19  
Old Jun 14, 2009, 10:24 PM
Inkedadeal Inkedadeal is offline
 
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Suga00, this reply was the most insightful by far. Why won't airlines put those cameras in place? As you note, it would be safer for employees as well as passengers...precisely my point.
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Old Jun 14, 2009, 10:29 PM
Suga00 Suga00 is offline
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Why won't they? No one on here would be able to answer that one for you, that will have to be answered by the people who run the airlines, you know, the people who don't actually work in these airports, who have no idea what really happens.
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  #21  
Old Jul 2, 2009, 9:10 PM
kadkooling kadkooling is offline
 
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I've learned my lesson to never fly Southwest Airlines. Dress, ring and pants stolen out of my checked bags in Baltimore. Customer Service says you only have 4 hours to notice and call them. I usually carry jewelry on me. Regardless, it was a $50 ring that looked like real, but NEVER leave anything that looks of value in check luggage. Nobody can be trusted in these times.
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  #22  
Old Jul 7, 2009, 8:26 PM
Gromit801 Gromit801 is offline
 
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I completely agree with you. Never pack anything of value in checked through luggage. If you must, the put a TSA lock on the bag, so if anything is missing from the bag, you only have to point at a TSA employee.

But I'm confused, why is this in the United Airlines section?
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Old Jul 8, 2009, 1:43 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Originally Posted by Gromit801 View Post
I completely agree with you. Never pack anything of value in checked through luggage. If you must, the put a TSA lock on the bag, so if anything is missing from the bag, you only have to point at a TSA employee.

But I'm confused, why is this in the United Airlines section?
Not to play "devil's advocate" here but couldn't an airline baggage employee obtain the tool that unlocks those TSA locks? I'm sure it wouldn't be too difficult. I also doubt that the mere presence of a TSA lock would totally absolve an airline employee from suspicion in a court of law.
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Old Jul 10, 2009, 5:37 PM
Gromit801 Gromit801 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 745

It is a special key that unlocks TSA locks, that only TSA is supposed to have, and are not allowed to give out.

So it still goes back to TSA being responsible. They have to account for the keys.
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