#1  
Old Oct 6, 2008, 4:35 PM
sdenni6728 sdenni6728 is offline
 
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Thumbs down Baggage charges!!!!!!!!! Never again NWA.

I checked in my baggage at NWA and was charged $20/bag or $40 for my flight. Fair? maybe. I booked a round trip ticket and was charged another $40 upon my boarding for my return. I had the same number of checked bags as my departure so why another $40!!!!!!!! I think it would be only fair to charge me once for my luggage for a round trip fight!!!!!! If I had more luggage on my return, then charge me the extra, not each way. Though my flight choices out of Montana are limited, I will never fly NWA again and have passed on this experience to all my friends.
  #2  
Old Oct 7, 2008, 3:04 AM
pattis pattis is offline
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Luggage charges for NW are $15 for first bag and $25 for 2nd bag. These fees are charged seperatly each trip. Being in Montana have nothing to do with NW bag charges. All cities whether BIL, BZM, HLN, MSO, GTF or good old FCA are going to charge the same.
  #3  
Old Oct 7, 2008, 5:20 AM
airhead airhead is offline
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Default Bag charges

The new bag charges are a big pain in the butt for all of us including the passengers. I am surprised, since deregulation in the 1970s, that it has taken this long for airline executives to figure it out that charging for individual bags is fairest thing to do in an open market. Then again, airline executives are more worried about the annual bottom line rather than the long term.

Would it be fair to charge a passenger for bags for both ways if they intend to only drop off some personal things to a family member one way? While other passengers are not checking bags, lightening the load for everyone else? Charging for each one way is the fairest thing if one is competing in the open market. That is what determines prices...supply and demand.
  #4  
Old Oct 7, 2008, 5:26 AM
Butch Cassidy Slept Here Butch Cassidy Slept Here is offline
 
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Location: Nearest Airports: COD, BIL, WRL
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Default Hard to keep promise

I will never fly NWA again and have passed on this experience

Northwest Air is no friend of mine. However, since Billings (BIL) is one of three airports I consider when traveling (the others are shown above,) I know following-through on this promise is hard to keep. I have yet to catch the Amtrak at Havre, but that may happen.

Anyway, all the airlines out of BIL charge for bags. Also, do you, REALLY, think United is better than Northwest?? If one has the time, and can get an early morning flight, Frontier Air, to Denver, (if they don't go out-of-business) is, probably, the best bet. You'll travel on a prop, you'll still pay bag fees, and you'll have to re-check your bags, in Denver, to your next airline (unless you stay on Frontier.) But, they are about as civilized as one can expect these days!

Finally, Great Lakes Air (all prop) may come to BIL. Also, they can ticket you (via Denver) through on most major carriers, as well as check your bags through. They're based in Cheyenne, and use local people for their call center--no people who live in Calcutta!
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[B][I][COLOR=navy][FONT=Arial Narrow]We HATE to fly--and it shows![/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=navy][FONT=Arial Narrow][/FONT][/COLOR][/I][/B]
  #5  
Old Oct 8, 2008, 1:50 AM
pattis pattis is offline
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Default Btw......

Just out of curiosity, which city in MT did you fly out of? I know alot of folks in FCA that work for NW.
  #6  
Old Oct 8, 2008, 9:08 PM
azstar azstar is offline
 
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You are wrong about checking bags with Frontier. First, they do NOT charge the first checked bag, and they DO interline bags to almost every U.S. airline that has baggage agreements.
  #7  
Old Oct 9, 2008, 4:00 PM
bah humbug bah humbug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azstar View Post
You are wrong about checking bags with Frontier. First, they do NOT charge the first checked bag, and they DO interline bags to almost every U.S. airline that has baggage agreements.

Sorry....but starting with tickets booked in September with travel in November Frontier DOES charge $15.00 for their 1st checked bag!!
  #8  
Old Oct 12, 2008, 6:01 PM
habss habss is offline
 
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Thumbs down RE: Baggage charges!!!!!!!!! Never again NWA.

Pattis, I gotta say this…you are one loyal NWA employee even if you’re always wrong!! Once again, if the airlines feel they need to charge more they should do it UP FRONT through their fares not through hidden or extra fees. What’s wrong with being able to easily assess who has the best deal? Can't you see that your customers are ******??!! Instead of defending your company, why don't you offer a sympathetic ear or a real suggestion that’s going to help?
  #9  
Old Oct 13, 2008, 4:51 PM
pattis pattis is offline
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First of all, I am not a NW employee or any of its afilliates. Sure, the charges suck, but IT IS NOT HIDDEN...just takes the person making the reservation an effort to read the agreement about baggage charges. I have made numerous reserv. through various websites (not non-rev) and every time...there it is plain as day about luggage fees. I do agree it sucks, however people have just become accustomed to having it free. You don't buy a movie ticket and get free popcorn and soda. As far as raising the prices all around...I do not agree. Passenger A takes 1 small carryon...no fee. Passenger B checks 3 very large bags. Of course they should pay for them. Why should Passenger A have to pay the same as B. IMHO what should be done is 1st bag free up to say 35-40 lbs. 2nd bag $50. Start charging for carryons. (not purse or computer case, just those big roll on bags. I think that would be better. As far as some constructive advice. Take the responsibility of reading terms and agreements of what you are purchasing. Not saying it is good or fair. But quit whining about it being hidden costs.
  #10  
Old Oct 14, 2008, 3:06 PM
habss habss is offline
 
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Pattis, this is as easy as pie...

First of all, the day I have to start reading all of the fine print on an airline ticket (and there is already a ton of it) is the day I stop flying.

Look, it's really very simple - if the airlines are really trying to be upfront about this they WOULD ADD THE COST TO THE TICKET PRICE like they have in the past. Anyone who has purchased a car can tell you how ****** they are when they find out the real price after all of the extra charges have been added. That's why car salesmen and auto dealerships consistently rank at the top of most mistrusted lists. Is that what the airlines want too? I'm OK with the extra charges if they're warranted (really I am) but THEY SHOULD BE UP FRONT AND ADD IT TO THE PRICE OF THE TICKET!!!

Using your "pay per use" argument they should start weighing that fat guy that always sits next to me on the plane that is 200+ pounds overweight and oooozes into my seat. Can you image scales at the airport for baggage AND passengers! Come on, admit it....the airlines are trying to do this under the radar so passengers don't revolt. Even so, once everyone figures out where this is going people will be even more ******. I stood in line for about 40 minutes yesterday (behind only 10 people) at an airport checking baggage because the attendants from the airlines were billing everyone for luggage. That's all we need is something else to slow down the process at the airport.

I'm telling you from what I saw there, people are ****** and are at the point where they're trying to justify if it's worth all the time and hassle. People that are going on vacation will avoid flying and stay closer to home and anyone that has to travel anywhere that's within 10-12 hours driving distance is going to think twice about flying. By the time you drive to the airport, find reasonable parking, check your bags and go through security you can easily burn 3 or more hours. Add that to the back end of your trip and the flight time and it's hardly worth it. I really don't think the airlines have factored all that in or will be able to afford the lost revenue. You can't charge your extra fees if travellers don't buy tickets in the first place.

Well Pattis, I wish you luck but I think your job is in serious jeopardy if the airlines continue down this path. Ask people that fly....they're not as ****** about the price as they are about the way this is all being handled.
  #11  
Old Oct 15, 2008, 5:24 AM
The_Judge The_Judge is offline
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I agree habass.............start driving instead. Everyone will be happier.
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Yes, the rules and policies favor the airlines unfairly. I do not dispute that.
  #12  
Old Oct 16, 2008, 4:47 AM
airhead airhead is offline
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Default bad analogy

You are not buying the airplane are you? You are paying for the ride. It would be very nice if all the passengers who are too lazy to read the fine print were to just not fly at all and make things easier for the rest of us, passengers included.

I know with anything I put more than a $100 into, I read the fine print. It helps me avoid looking ignorant.
  #13  
Old Oct 19, 2008, 7:53 PM
habss habss is offline
 
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Posts: 10
Exclamation Good handle - "Airhead"

This is part of an article from CNN travel...I think it says it all...

By Christopher Elliott
Tribune Media Services



(Tribune Media Services) -- When it comes to airline ticket rules, the devil isn't in the details. The devil is the details.
You'll find Satan in something called the ticket tariff, which is a massive, rambling and often incomprehensible document that passengers rarely see in its entirety.
Why? Partly because they tell you what you already know -- for example, that you have to pay a fee if you want to change your ticket -- and partly because it just doesn't concern you. For instance, some tariff rules talk about special fares for police officers or firefighters, which a vast majority of passengers wouldn't care about.
But there's another reason why you won't see these rules: Airlines would rather you not know about them. That's because they like to bury all kinds of restrictions in the fine print, hoping their passenger won't read them until it's too late.
"These rules are put there for one reason, and one reason alone," says Rick Seaney, the chief executive of the Web site Farecompare.com. "To maximize revenue."

This is from another article:

It is well within the airlines' capabilities to do the math and disclose the true ticket price up front. It's clearly the right thing to do from the standpoint of their customers, and the airlines should be required to do so.
According to the latest University of Michigan American Customer Satisfaction Index, the airlines' credibility with consumers is at a seven-year low, behind such perennial underperformers as cellular service providers. At the same time, the airlines' fuzzy math has become the butt of cocktail party jokes. Perhaps the solution to the airlines' credibility crisis lies simply in telling the truth.

My guess is that there are a whack more people that agree with me than you! Just type "misleading airline practices" in any search engine and you'll see article after article about the deceptive practices of the airlines...

Airhead - I have a business to run and don't have time to read pages of fine print and I'd hazard a guess that 98% of the flying public doesn't either. All I can tell you is that if I ran my business the way the airlines do I wouldn't be in business long. My guess though is that every one of the major airlines will be at the trough trying to get their mitts on some of that 700 billion the government is handing out because once again they've mismanaged their businesses!
Enjoy you're job...you won't have it long!

Last edited by habss; Oct 19, 2008 at 7:56 PM.
  #14  
Old Oct 19, 2008, 8:03 PM
habss habss is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 10
Exclamation Good handle - "Airhead"

This is part of an article from CNN travel...I think it says it all...

By Christopher Elliott
Tribune Media Services



(Tribune Media Services) -- When it comes to airline ticket rules, the devil isn't in the details. The devil is the details.
You'll find Satan in something called the ticket tariff, which is a massive, rambling and often incomprehensible document that passengers rarely see in its entirety.
Why? Partly because they tell you what you already know -- for example, that you have to pay a fee if you want to change your ticket -- and partly because it just doesn't concern you. For instance, some tariff rules talk about special fares for police officers or firefighters, which a vast majority of passengers wouldn't care about.
But there's another reason why you won't see these rules: Airlines would rather you not know about them. That's because they like to bury all kinds of restrictions in the fine print, hoping their passenger won't read them until it's too late.
"These rules are put there for one reason, and one reason alone," says Rick Seaney, the chief executive of the Web site Farecompare.com. "To maximize revenue."

This is from another article:

It is well within the airlines' capabilities to do the math and disclose the true ticket price up front. It's clearly the right thing to do from the standpoint of their customers, and the airlines should be required to do so.
According to the latest University of Michigan American Customer Satisfaction Index, the airlines' credibility with consumers is at a seven-year low, behind such perennial underperformers as cellular service providers. At the same time, the airlines' fuzzy math has become the butt of cocktail party jokes. Perhaps the solution to the airlines' credibility crisis lies simply in telling the truth.


My guess is that there are a whack more people that agree with me than you! Just type "misleading airline practices" in any search engine and you'll see article after article about the deceptive practices of the airlines...

Airhead - I have a business to run and don't have time to read pages of fine print and I'd hazard a guess that 98% of the flying public doesn't either. All I can tell you is that if I ran my business the way the airlines do I wouldn't be in business long. My guess though is that every one of the major airlines will be at the trough trying to get their mitts on some of that 700 billion the government is handing out because once again they've mismanaged their businesses!
Enjoy you're job...you won't have it long!
  #15  
Old Oct 19, 2008, 8:11 PM
habss habss is offline
 
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Default And another thing...

Want an all-inclusive airline ticket price? Then sign this petition now

If you’re angry about deceptive airline ticket prices — and let’s be honest, who isn’t? — here’s some good news. A travel site largely responsible for Europe’s new price transparency rule is taking aim at the U.S., and it needs your help.
Lessno, as you’ll recall from a previous blog post, was frustrated with sites that offered a low “base” fare, only to have fees, taxes and surcharges tacked on to it. So it lobbied Meglena Kuneva, the European Union Commissioner for Consumer Affairs, to change its fare rules. And it did.
Today on its site, Lessno launched a campaign to persuade U.S. lawmakers to make similar changes. Here’s the text of the letter it wants you to sign.
We, the undersigned, urge members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives to immediately and without delay hold hearings on the practice of advertising misleading airfare prices by those in the travel industry.
- For too long, airlines, travel agents, and airfare resellers have been tricking American travelers into purchasing air tickets for a price that does not accurately reflect the true cost to the customer.


- For too long, airlines, travel agents, and airfare resellers have been arbitrarily creating extra fees including gas surcharges, security fees, ticket issuing fees, etc. that raise the cost of airfare dramatically over the advertised price.
- For too long, airlines, travel agents, and airfare resellers have gone without oversight from governmental authorities that has enabled them to abuse and mislead American travelers.
- For too long, airlines, travel agents, and airfare resellers have used their lobbyists and significant economic clout to keep legislators at bay and break truth in advertising laws at federal, state, and local levels.
We petition the government to stop these abuses and guarantee transparency in airfare.
We urge the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation; the Senate Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs; the Senate Subcommittee on Aviation Operation; the House Committee on Transportation; the House Subcommittee on Aviation; the House Committee on Energy and Commerce; and the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection to all hold independent hearings into this dangerous and deceptive practice.
We ask that the government follows the lead of the European Commission, which requires that advertised airfare prices include all taxes and fees so that America consumers can make informed travel decisions.
  #16  
Old Oct 19, 2008, 9:00 PM
Leatherboy2006 Leatherboy2006 is offline
 
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Two things for habss
1. You have a business to run and don't read small print? How do you stay in business? Small print is everywere and in every business. Don't know if I'd do business with someone who doesn't read the small print.
2. The USA does not want a group from Europe influencing what laws we pass, they start on this and the next thing you know we might as well surrender our government to the EU. Your quoting that fact has made me write to my Senator and Congressman from Texas and ask them not to support it and advise of that groups activity.
ok I am going to ad a 3rd point. Like you I don't like getting stuck next to the fat person on the plane, theres a reason I hit the gym 4-5 times a week and don't make fast food my dinner, lunch or breakfast. Put until people start taking care of themselves and hiding behind their laziness on taking care of themselves we are going to have to deal with the 200lb + person. Remeber Southwest tried to make them buy another seat and the fat people sued and even tried to fall under ADA.
  #17  
Old Oct 19, 2008, 11:55 PM
habss habss is offline
 
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Default Clearly an airline employee

Aren't airline employees supposed to declare that when they register on this site???

Dear Members,

If you are an employee of an airline (or former employee), you are now required to join your employer User Group to identify you as such on
this page.

Look leatherboy...

Yes I run a business and have people that read fine print for me...I would fire them though if all they had to do was read it on an airline ticket! By the way, my business is thriving. Why? because I'm up front with my customers and don't try to scam them through fine print and hidden / extra fees.

As for the EU thing...a good idea is a good idea I don't care where it comes from. Oh and when you write your congressman just make sure you're honest and tell him you work for an airline that way at least he can put it in perspective....

You see that the airlines could only scam so long in the Europe and once your boy Obama gets elected, there's gonna be so many regulations that you guys won't know if you're coming or going! Extra fees? Good luck!
  #18  
Old Oct 20, 2008, 1:01 AM
Leatherboy2006 Leatherboy2006 is offline
 
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Actually I market leather goods and handle business affairs for my uncle and cousins funeral home. So I suggest you know what you are responding to and also I am supporting a third party presidential nomineee,,,,,yes they are out there GO RALPH.
You must be fat since that part of my message didn't offend...two words JENNY CRAIG
  #19  
Old Oct 20, 2008, 3:25 AM
habss habss is offline
 
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Default Obviously you didn't read my messages...

What I said was if the airlines are going be consistent they should start charging people by the pound because there is a lot more excess weight carried by obese people on the plane than there is by the odd person carrying an extra bag or two. I am as physically fit as can be my friend and weigh exactly my ideal weight for my height. I actually fit in the seat so it wouldn't cost me an extra dime!

Leather goods - I doubt it. By looking at your postings no one sticks up for the airline industry like you do unless your one of them or are the "significant other" to one of them. Mortician - now that I believe, they all have such great personalities...

The airline industry is a mess and only those that are on the inside or are brain dead don't see it. Again, just read the web or any newspaper and you'll see story after story after story of airline incompetence and mismanagement.

Go Ralph - what a joke! That guy would come down even harder on your industry - he hates free enterprise and thinks everything should be free. No need to waste two words on you, I have just one - oh never mind it's not worth it.
  #20  
Old Oct 20, 2008, 3:38 AM
Leatherboy2006 Leatherboy2006 is offline
 
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I do the office/paper work for the funeral home and not that embalming. Besides doing sales with friends of mine at leather events (we design and sell adult (something your not) leather cloths and items. I have also modeled at the events.
Ralph Nader has never come down hard on either the Funeral business or Leather goods.
I have many friends here in Dallas that work for both Southwest and American and dated (and still friends) with one of American's flight attendants and still go to his parties. Plus dealing with shipping of human remains and leather items one has to read the FINE PRINT on shipping both interstate and international.
With the pay and inheritance I have, I do not need to worry about taking the bus or train.
Since your from Montana, I know your sheep must be happy
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