Customer Service Have you had any problems with US Airways' Customer Service? Have US Airways employees treated you poorly?

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  #1  
Old Oct 2, 2009, 2:47 PM
mrs.doublea mrs.doublea is offline
 
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My husband, 9 month old, and I were flying to see my in-laws in State College, PA. We have to stop in Philadelphia on the way to and from using US Air. Philadelphia always has you coming or leaving late or both, but normally your next flight is also delayed. On our trip home, we landed in Philly 10 minutes after our flight to Jax boarded and it wasn't delayed. We found the only other flight out for the night was with Southwest and they don't accept US Air tickets. We went to US Air "customer service" and were told that the only thing they would do is get us out of Philly between 6:30 and 6:45 the next morning. When we asked what we were suppose to do about our baby only having enough food for the night, we were ignored. They didn't offer us a hotel or anything, so we had to pay $511 and change for Southwest tickets to get home the same evening and have enough food for our baby. We were told that since it was Air Traffic Control's fault, they aren't responsible for hotel vouchers or anything else, so I would have had to pay for a cab to get my child formula and a cab back to sleep in an airport...seriously, I haven't ever been treated so badly and with a baby!!! I wouldn't have cared as much had it just been my husband and I, but how was my child suppose to go without food for that long and we wouldn't have gotten home until 11:30 the next morning! Thanks US Air for confirming our hate for you and the fact that we'll drive before we fly with you again! They also refused to deliver our luggage and so we had to go back the next day and pick up our carseat and luggage.
  #2  
Old Oct 2, 2009, 3:56 PM
Silent Bob Silent Bob is offline
 
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The sad fact is, no matter what airline you fly, none will give you anything for air traffic and weather delays, even Southwest. Also as I am aware, if you misconnect on Southwest, you can't transfer to another airline as they don't have an agreement with any other airline. But my question, but if you have 511 dollars for new tickets on Southwest.... uhmmmmm.... why not use the money for a hotel and food for your baby? The 511 you spent? That was actually more than enough to book a room, get a cab to get food, plus USairs would have rebooked you.
  #3  
Old Oct 2, 2009, 6:39 PM
mrs.doublea mrs.doublea is offline
 
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We actually didn't have $511...we had to have a relative pay for us. If we're going to have to expend the money for a hotel, cab, food, baby food, etc. why not spend the money to go home and be comfortable?!? Most hotels don't have cribs that I know of, so how would my baby have really gotten to sleep there either? The fact is that US Air should have offered some sort of compensation and they could have held the flight knowing it was the last flight out for the night and our flight landed only 5-10 minutes after they backed away from the gate. They sat on the runway in line for at least 30 minutes before taking off. They also could have at least been kind at customer service and not rude as if we were inconveniencing them.
  #4  
Old Oct 2, 2009, 9:05 PM
Gromit801 Gromit801 is offline
 
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Flights close at about 10-15 minutes before departure. That means the paperwork and manifest is finalized, and stand-by passengers have gotten the empty seats. All airlines do this. So all those customers already on the plane, and ready to go, should now have to wait for you? Maybe miss THEIR connections? Being a bit selfish there.

As far as the staff goes, maybe they were rude, maybe not. I wasn't there to see it. From experience observing agents in high stress situations (like a late flight) most of the time they tend to reply in kind. If they're treated rudely, they might react rudely. That's human. They probably shouldn't, but at the end of the day with someone in their face, I can just image how it might go.
  #5  
Old Oct 2, 2009, 10:52 PM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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If you're not traveling on a non-stop flight then you should always have enough funds for a hotel and at least one meal in case you find yourself stuck at a connecting airport. This goes double when traveling with children. At the very least you should have had some extra food/formula in your carryon for your child.

By the way...most hotels do have cribs.

As for you still believing you should have received some compensation...why? It was an ATC delay so nobody on your flight who missed their connections was compensated in any way. Do you think you're so special just because you're traveling with a small child?

Last edited by PHXFlyer; Oct 2, 2009 at 10:54 PM.
  #6  
Old Oct 3, 2009, 9:51 PM
AirlinesMustPay AirlinesMustPay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs.doublea View Post
Philadelphia always has you coming or leaving late or both, We were told that since it was Air Traffic Control's fault, they aren't responsible for hotel vouchers or anything else,

It seems the OP knew a little too much and this knowledge worked against her. She knew that Philadelphia always has you coming or leaving late or both. So I gather that she at once put the blame on the air traffic controllers because her flight which presumably was to arrive in time for her to catch her flight, arrived too late.

So was this the scenario:

Mrs Doublea to USAirways agent: I know the fault is with the air traffic controllers and I lost my connecting flight, what is my child going to eat?

US Airways agent: Since it is Air Traffic Control's fault, we are not responsible

If it was me, I have never landed in Philadelphia and so being ignorant of Philadelphia's delays of aircraft (and not as well informed as the OP) I would have gone to the USAir counter and say, "You brought me too late for me to catch my flight out and I want you to pay for my hotel tonight and baby food for my child."

I think US air is liable. The reason is that unless there was some unusual situation, e.g. air traffic controllers strike, outside of their control, they are in breach of their contract with her which was to bring her at a certain time to make that connection. They must know from their computers who is arriving to make the connection and if they sell the seats to stand by passengers and take off without the arriving passengers who are stuck on their aircraft arriving at the gate too late, then they must foot the bill occasioned by the delay.

Something unusual like a strike would frustrate a contract and then no side is in breach, but if the OP knows that PHiladelphia has delays (I presume this means a delay in the aircraft getting to the gate even when the aircraft touches down on time), then the airlines surely know of this situation and they must plan their schedules to take this into consideration. Passengers dont help them to plan schedules. They do and must take responsibility.

In this case the OP chose to pay $511 for new flights. This is entirely reasonable given that she had a baby and needed to get home.

I would think she has a valid claim and should write to the airline to demand compensation

Last edited by AirlinesMustPay; Oct 3, 2009 at 9:53 PM. Reason: typo
  #7  
Old Oct 3, 2009, 10:58 PM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirlinesMustPay View Post
If it was me, I have never landed in Philadelphia and so being ignorant of Philadelphia's delays of aircraft (and not as well informed as the OP) I would have gone to the USAir counter and say, "You brought me too late for me to catch my flight out and I want you to pay for my hotel tonight and baby food for my child."
The reply to which would have been "It's an air traffic control delay - we don't give meal/hotel vouchers when it's ATC and/or weather."

The reason for the flight delay is posted in the computer. It's right there for any agent to see. The way in which the agent is approached or the semantics of the question isn't going to change what they are trained to do. If an agent had issued any voucher for the OP or any other affected passenger he or she would have been disciplined and possibly fired.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AirlinesMustPay View Post
I think US air is liable. The reason is that unless there was some unusual situation, e.g. air traffic controllers strike, outside of their control, they are in breach of their contract with her which was to bring her at a certain time to make that connection. They must know from their computers who is arriving to make the connection and if they sell the seats to stand by passengers and take off without the arriving passengers who are stuck on their aircraft arriving at the gate too late, then they must foot the bill occasioned by the delay.

Something unusual like a strike would frustrate a contract and then no side is in breach, but if the OP knows that PHiladelphia has delays (I presume this means a delay in the aircraft getting to the gate even when the aircraft touches down on time), then the airlines surely know of this situation and they must plan their schedules to take this into consideration. Passengers dont help them to plan schedules. They do and must take responsibility.

In this case the OP chose to pay $511 for new flights. This is entirely reasonable given that she had a baby and needed to get home.

I would think she has a valid claim and should write to the airline to demand compensation
Unfortunately you are completely wrong here. I don't disagree that it would have been a nice gesture for the airline to do something for this person but what they do for one they would end up doing for all. Philadelphia's air space is part of the congested northeast region which includes the three New York area airports (six if you count White Plains, Long Island MacArthur and Hartford) and Boston Logan and Providence. ATC delays are common and the common factor in the ATC delays is weather. If the wind picks up or there is any weather that reduces visibility even by a small amount ATC must space arriving and departing aircraft further apart. Because aircraft are not departing/arriving as quickly it causes delays. ATC will also issue ground stops to aircraft which haven't even taken off yet to keep them out of the airspace of the affected airport.

So you see even though it's officially labeled as an ATC delay the root cause is weather over which the airline has no control and is therefore not liable for any consequences of the delay.
  #8  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 12:22 AM
AirlinesMustPay AirlinesMustPay is offline
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I am now enlightened as to what is being called an ATC problem. I had thought that the aircraft touched down on time, but congestion in the airport prevented it from reaching the gate. It is apparently something which prevents the aircraft from landing although they are hovering in the air ready to land.

Does that exonerate the airline? Absolutely not.

The passenger and the airline had a contract. She was to get into Philadelphia at a certain time and with enough time to catch a flight on another flight of the very same airline.

That can't be termed a "weather" problem which will provide the airline with an excuse, even if ATC slows down landing because of weather conditions. A weather problem that will excuse the airline is like if a flight is cancelled or delayed because of an approaching storm.

Parties to a contract are held liable if they do not perform. If the contract is frustrated by circumstances which they do not contemplate when the contract is made. They did not contemplate a storm on a particular day, so that is an excuse. If the air traffic controllers went on strike they also did not contemplate that.

However you say that that is the customary situation at Philadelphia. Even if it was because of visibility problem, it is the situation always to be contemplated by both the passengers and the airline if I understand both the OP and PHX correctly.

The airline must cater for that in planning their schedules. When their flight out of Philadelphia took off without the OP, they must have known that connecting passengers were on an arriving flight that was being delayed by ATC. They also must have expected such an occurrence since it is a regular occurrence. what they did was to make money on their seats by most likely selling them to stand by passengers. They could have held back the leaving flight until the passengers making the connection arrived. Its their decision and some would be inconvenienced either way. They chose to inconvenience those arriving, by allowing the leaving flight to leave on time. Long term they should plan schedules with longer times for connections. Again their decision.

As a passenger the OP need not get into all that. All her concern is, she did not make the connecting flight and there was no unusual occurence that frustrated the contract of carriage. If that was in Court, the airline has no sustainable argument that I could see.
  #9  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 1:56 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirlinesMustPay View Post
As a passenger the OP need not get into all that. All her concern is, she did not make the connecting flight and there was no unusual occurence that frustrated the contract of carriage. If that was in Court, the airline has no sustainable argument that I could see.
You are still missing the point. It is in all airlines' Contract of Carriage. Here's Continental's:

Quote:
RULE 24 FLIGHT DELAYS/CANCELLATIONS/AIRCRAFT CHANGES (revised December 7, 2007)

A)General

3) Schedules are Subject To Change Without Notice - Times shown on ticket, timetable or elsewhere are not guaranteed and form no part of the Contract of Carriage. CO will notify Passengers at the gate and on board an affected aircraft, in a timely manner, of the best available information regarding known delays, cancellations, and diversions. CO will not be responsible for errors or omissions either in timetables or other representation of schedules. No employee, agent or representative of CO is authorized to bind CO by any flight information statement.

B)Definitions - For the purpose of this Rule, the following terms have the meanings below:

4)Force Majeure Event – any of the following situations:
a)Any condition beyond CO’s control including, but not limited to, meteorological conditions, acts of God, riots, terrorist activities, civil commotions, embargoes, wars, hostilities, disturbances, or unsettled international conditions, either actual, threatened or reported, or any delay, demand, circumstances, or requirement due directly or indirectly to such condition;
b)Any strike, work stoppage, slowdown, lockout, or any other labor-related dispute involving or affecting CO’s services;
c)Any governmental regulation, demand or requirement;
d)Any shortage of labor, fuel, or facilities of CO or others;
e)Damage to CO’s Aircraft or equipment caused by another party;
f)Any emergency situation requiring immediate care or protection for a person or property; or
g)Any event not reasonably foreseen, anticipated or predicted by CO.
And here are the relevant parts of US Airways' COC:

Quote:
9.0 DELAYED AND CANCELLED FLIGHTS

9.1 US AIRWAYS’ RESPONSIBILITY FOR SCHEDULES AND OPERATIONS
US Airways undertakes to use its best efforts to transport the customer and baggage with reasonable dispatch. Times shown in timetables or elsewhere are not guaranteed and form no part of the terms of transportation. US Airways may substitute alternate carriers or aircraft and may alter or omit stopping places shown on the ticket in case of necessity. Schedules are subject to change without notice. US Airways is not responsible or liable for making connections, for failing to operate any flight according to schedule, or for changing the schedule of any flight.

9.6 AMENITIES/SERVICES FOR DELAYED CUSTOMERS
When a ticketed customer holds a confirmed reservation on a flight, US Airways may assume limited expenses incurred as a result of a flight cancellation or schedule irregularity resulting in a delay exceeding four hours as outlined below. US Airways may also provide special amenities and services which, in US Airways’ judgment, are required by certain customers such as unaccompanied children, customers requiring special assistance, and customers with medical conditions, in order to maintain the safety, health, and welfare of such customers. Amenities will not be made available to a customer on any US Airways flight which is delayed or cancelled in the metropolitan area where the customer resides.

US Airways will provide a food voucher to customers whose flights have been cancelled or delayed for four hours or more, during normal meal times, when the delay is not due to Air Traffic Control, weather, or other circumstances beyond US Airways’ control. The food voucher may be used at a restaurant in the airport or a hotel restaurant for customers who are also accommodated overnight. The value of the food voucher will vary according to whether it is for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. In the event of a delay or cancellation, overnight accommodations will be arranged by US Airways, at their expense, for customers at connecting points whose flights are delayed or cancelled because of circumstances within US Airways’ control for whom no alternate transportation is available. Overnightaccommodations will not be provided for customers whose flights are delayed or cancelled due to circumstances beyond US Airways’ control such as Air Traffic Control or weather . Overnight accommodations include a hotel and transportation to and from the hotel selected by US Airways. Food vouchers will be provided if the customer misses dinner and/or breakfast due to delay or cancellation.
Other airlines' COCs contain similar language.

So your arguments are all covered by the contract of carriage which states that scheduled departure/arrival times are never guaranteed and that a delay due to either weather or ATC delays precludes the passenger from receiving any amenities or services in the form of food vouchers or hotel accommodations paid for by the airline.

There were some special considerations where the condition of weather/ATC delays would be waived but the OP did not fall into any of those categories. Sorry, but your arguments are all wrong. You say you're an attorney but perhaps you should actually read the various contracts of carriage before posting legal advice. I'm sorry but the OP is entitled to nothing. As a customer service gesture US Airways may issue travel vouchers for the value of the unused portions of their tickets since the OP bought the other tickets on Southwest but US is not going to reimburse her the $511 she paid for those tickets.
  #10  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 2:27 AM
AirlinesMustPay AirlinesMustPay is offline
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PHX I know what the ticket says, but this OP had a connecting flight on the same airline. Her contract was not just to land in PHilly. It if was and she arrived late and was say late for a wedding, the airline would not comnpensate her. But she had a connection and in your reasoning you do not deal with how the airline will escape liability for the connecting flight leaving without her. They are in breach. Even if for ATC reasons their aircraft arrived late in Philadelphia, it was not ATC control that led them to decide to let the next plane take off without the connecting passengers. That was their decision and it was that, and not the late arrival that caused the problem

Last edited by AirlinesMustPay; Oct 4, 2009 at 2:30 AM.
  #11  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 2:43 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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And just to add...you keep saying that since delays in Philadelphia are such a common occurrence why don't the flight schedules reflect this? Actually, they do. It's built into the block time which is the time between the scheduled departure and arrival. Looking at the State College to Philadelphia flights the block times are all between 55-57 minutes. During normal operations the flight takes between 41-47 minutes so there is about 10-15 minutes of built in time for taxi and other minor delays. Weather and ATC delays are fairly common in the northeast but are not an everyday occurrence so if there was to much time built into the schedule most flights would be arriving far earlier than scheduled and the time of the ground would be increased. The airline isn't making money unless the aircraft are in the air.

I think the OP should also ask herself why she booked such a tight connection in the first place. It sounds as though even if the flight from State College had been on-time they would have been pressed for time on the connection anyway. When one books a flight there is an automatic minimum connect time which does not allow one to book connecting flights which are too close together but the OP knew Philadelphia can sometimes be problematic and should have chosen the flights she booked with that knowledge.
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 2:49 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirlinesMustPay View Post
PHX I know what the ticket says, but this OP had a connecting flight on the same airline. Her contract was not just to land in PHilly. It if was and she arrived late and was say late for a wedding, the airline would not comnpensate her. But she had a connection and in your reasoning you do not deal with how the airline will escape liability for the connecting flight leaving without her. They are in breach. Even if for ATC reasons their aircraft arrived late in Philadelphia, it was not ATC control that led them to decide to let the next plane take off without the connecting passengers. That was their decision and it was that, and not the late arrival that caused the problem
The last flight of the day from Philadelphia to Jacksonville i usually operated on an A319 aircraft which holds 124 passengers. Assuming the flight was full you are saying that US Airways should have delayed 122 passengers to wait for 2 who were on a late connecting flight? By your logic US Airways would then have to compensate those 122 for a late arrival in Jacksonville.

What kind of law do you practice anyway? And which Law School dd you graduate from? I would suggest you go back for some continuing education but consider another school!
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 2:51 AM
AirlinesMustPay AirlinesMustPay is offline
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Let me give you an example. If you pay me to pick you up from your home in New Jersey, bring you to the 34th Street heliport by limousine where I have helicopter waiting, and then transport you on my helicopter to somewhere on Long Island, all for one price. My employee picks you up at NJ and on the way the cops stop him for a case of mistaken identity. He is delayed for an hour through no fault of mine or his. He arrives an hour late to the heliport. I am sitting in my helicopter with another passenger who arrived on his own to the heliport, but is making the same trip as you to Long Island.

My employe phones me an lets me know that the police have stopped him and will be an hour late bringing you. But I have another passenger who will be delayed if I wait for you.

Now if I have a contract with you whose fine print says that I am not liable for delays if my employees get stopped unnecessarily by the police. That will relieve me of liability for the delay in bringing you to the heliport. But if I decide that I will leave in the helicopter before you arrive, am I not liabile to you if you have to take another form of transport to Long Island? That fine print is not going to help me.

Your lost trip on the helicopter did not come from the delay in arriving at the heliport. That was neither my fault nor yours. Your lost trip came from my decision which I took to leave without you, knowing you were late in my employee,s car arriving to the heliport.

This is exactly the situation that the OP was in.

Last edited by AirlinesMustPay; Oct 4, 2009 at 2:55 AM.
  #14  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:03 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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This is exactly the situation that the OP was in.
No, it is not. Apples/Oranges.

Try again.
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:05 AM
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Originally Posted by PHXFlyer View Post
Assuming the flight was full you are saying that US Airways should have delayed 122 passengers to wait for 2 who were on a late connecting flight? By your logic US Airways would then have to compensate those 122 for a late arrival in Jacksonville.
!
Not at all. US Air's decision was to leave so that they would not have to compensate the 122 for delay in their take off. So be it. Their decision. When they weighed which compensation would be less it would be for the two who were left behind. So compensate the 2 who were inconvenienced. It makes perfect sense to take off with the 122 and compensate the 2. You said it, almost.

Since you asked, I was called to the Bar in London, England and I practice civil litigation. So you do us the favour since you are impliedly expressing an opinion on the legality of the airline's acts, and tell us, which law school did you attend and what kind of law do you practice?
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:12 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Not at all. US Air's decision was to leave so that they would not have to compensate the 122 for delay in their take off. So be it. Their decision. When they weighed which compensation would be less it would be for the two who were left behind. So compensate the 2 who were inconvenienced. It makes perfect sense to take off with the 122 and compensate the 2. You said it, almost.

Since you asked, I was called to the Bar in London, England and I practice civil litigation. So you do us the favour since you are impliedly expressing an opinion on the legality of the airline's acts, and tell us, which law school did you attend and what kind of law do you practice?
I said by your logic/statement they would have to compensate those 122 delayed passengers when in reality they would not. It was simply a choice of inconveniencing 2 or 122. Furthermore you don't know where the aircraft was scheduled to fly after the Philadelphia to Jacksonville flight. Jacksonville is not a US Airways hub so it may very well have gone back to Philadelphia or even Charlotte. By delaying the departure not only would the 122 going to Jacksonville be delayed but those waiting for the aircraft in Jacksonville as well. You are so short-sighted it is unbelievable.
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PHXFlyer View Post
I said by your logic/statement they would have to compensate those 122 delayed passengers when in reality they would not. It was simply a choice of inconveniencing 2 or 122. Furthermore you don't know where the aircraft was scheduled to fly after the Philadelphia to Jacksonville flight. Jacksonville is not a US Airways hub so it may very well have gone back to Philadelphia or even Charlotte. By delaying the departure not only would the 122 going to Jacksonville be delayed but those waiting for the aircraft in Jacksonville as well. You are so short-sighted it is unbelievable.
But none of that is the passengers business. She had a contract with the airline to take her from Philadelphia to Jacksonville when she arrived in Philadelphia and they defaulted. End of story.
  #18  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:32 AM
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But none of that is the passengers business. She had a contract with the airline to take her from Philadelphia to Jacksonville when she arrived in Philadelphia and they defaulted. End of story.
No, sir, they did not. They offered her a flight the following morning. Had she paid for a hotel or slept in the airport she could have taken that flight. She opted to pay for a ticket on a different airline instead of flying the next morning. That was her choice. Because the delay was caused by weather/ATC issues US Airways was not obligated to provide her with food or a hotel. US Airways did not say she couldn't fly any further and did not strand her. Had she been able to financially she could have checked into a hotel for the night and been in Jacksonville the next morning. She obviously did not have enough cash nor sufficient credit to pay for the hotel, did not want to sleep in the airport, so she called a family member who paid for the Southwest tickets using their credit card.

As I said before, and as a gesture of goodwill, US Airways may refund the remaining value of the unused tickets in the form of a voucher since the tickets were most likely non-refundable. That's the most the OP should expect but should not be surprised if they do nothing since she is owed nothing.
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 3:50 AM
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BTW you may be interested in knowing that time and again Courts have ruled against the validity of that fine writing that is found on printed tickets, which is the same thing you quoted above. The leading U.S. case is Lisi v Alitalia a 1967 case reported in the American Journal of International Law Vol 61 page 812. The airline sought to rely on those conditions of carriage to exclude their liability, but failed to show that the conditions of carriage were adequately brought to the attention of the passenger even though the passenger had received a ticket from his travel agent with those printed conditions, and the Court held that the passenger was not bound by it.
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 4:13 AM
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In case any lawyer read my above post, and thinks I don't know, the Lisi doctrine has been tempered somewhat by later cases. The Lisi case went as far as saying that the Warsaw Convention was made inapplicable because the passenger did not see the writing on the ticket. Later judgments found that the Warsaw Convention was still applicable, because it was an international "Convention, but what all Courts have agreed is, and this is what is relevant to our present discussion, is that where airlines make conditions of carriage that are not the subject of the Convention (like this case) these conditions must be brought to the attention of the passenger for them to be valid. Those conditions you quoted are not in any Convention
  #21  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 4:29 AM
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airlinesmustpay, it seems like you are contradicting yourself a bunch, also by one of your examples (the helicopter one) over here in the US at least cops are not allowed to just randomly pull you over unless they actually did something or have some kind of warrent or unpaid requirements, so you can be pulled over for speeding, invalid registration, no insurance, etc, but theres gotta be a reason

but to this subject, it does seem like your saying that they should hold the plane for 2 people, which is actually very inconsiderate to the many, pilots and flight attendants have their scheduled hours, people want to get back home or to the hotel or whereever to sleep, and there are rules and regulations to when planes are allowed to fly due to noise complaints (not sure when it takes off/lands)

and what if the couples first flight is delayed 3 hours and they only had an hour connecting time for example, are you suggesting that they wait 2 hours just for 2 people? that would be nice for the couple, but think about the majority, they will be ******, and if they did wait than the second they get on the plane there will be a ton of looks coming their way.

US air offered to get them to jacksonville, so they were still keeping their part of the contract, the couple decided to modify/cancel it by paying to go on a different airline, so that is their fault not the airlines

ATC and weather are not controled by the airlines, and if they were than life would be simple, and it would be sunny and 70*F everyday, but its not, and at philadelphia if you miss your slot than it can take a long time before you can take off

airlinesmustpay:I had thought that the aircraft touched down on time, but congestion in the airport prevented it from reaching the gate. It is apparently something which prevents the aircraft from landing although they are hovering in the air ready to land.
i dont know about you, but if they have to slow down airtraffic due to congestion than i may feel more relieved, it would be safer and it seems that warnings have been increasing, so it is safer in my books to slow it down to a reasonable pace where it isnt delaying drastically

also everyone knosw that it was a very close connecting time and know that philly is notorious for delays and that people need to plan accordingly, or see if there is a different route (even if it costs a few more $)
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Old Oct 4, 2009, 4:34 AM
mars6423 mars6423 is offline
 
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talking about conditions on tickets, that must be ONE GIANT ticket if they wanna fit everything on, now a days they put it on the web and other areas, many people dont look at the ticket in the first place, just look at date, time, airline

and it happens in alot of areas, people go oh it wasnt visable, i didnt notice it, it wasn't my fault, etc, and all you need to do is point to them here it is and they go ooooooooh yeah now i see maybe i should read what it says next time and not just jump to conclusions, and sometimes you see the same people make the same mistake again, but maybe we will all learn that you got to look at things before they go south
  #23  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 5:27 AM
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Originally Posted by mars6423 View Post
talking about conditions on tickets, that must be ONE GIANT ticket if they wanna fit everything on, now a days they put it on the web and other areas, many people dont look at the ticket in the first place, just look at date, time, airline

and it happens in alot of areas, people go oh it wasnt visable, i didnt notice it, it wasn't my fault, etc, and all you need to do is point to them here it is and they go ooooooooh yeah now i see maybe i should read what it says next time and not just jump to conclusions, and sometimes you see the same people make the same mistake again, but maybe we will all learn that you got to look at things before they go south

Well perhaps you are right and the US Supreme Court was wrong. Next time Alitalia may want to retain you to put their case to the Court.
  #24  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 5:53 AM
AirlinesMustPay AirlinesMustPay is offline
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Originally Posted by mars6423 View Post

US air offered to get them to jacksonville, so they were still keeping their part of the contract, the couple decided to modify/cancel it by paying to go on a different airline, so that is their fault not the airlines

Just what planet are you guys living on? Surely not planet earth. And Surely not in America. Because no one on this planet will consider that it was reasonable for a passenger to overnight in an airport with a baby. But baby aside, If a passenger has a ticket to travel in the evening and the airline says we will put you on another flight in the morning, that is a breach. Their contract of carriage was for a particular flight. You will find that American Courts will dismiss any argument that the contract is not for any particular time. based on that written contract of carriage, unless that writing was brought specifically by the airline or its agent to the attention of the passenger. If the 122 passengers were told that their flight was leaving at 6 in the morning instead of the evening before, can you imagine the uproar in the airport. And because it was just the 2 it becomes OK.? I have kept on saying, the airline makes its decision who to fly and who to leave behind. And if they chose to fly the 122 on time and leave the 2 behind, that's a prudent business decision. It is prudent because they leave only 2 aggrieved passengers and have 122 flying on time. The airline is definitely in breach of contract with these two. I cannot understand why anyone would think that it is acceptable to offer passengers a flight the next morning, and this is not a breach of contract.

What about if passengers turn up next morning for a flight that left the evening before, will the airline honour their ticket? If the passenger has an obligation to show up for a particular flight at a particular time, then the airline has a reciprocal obligation to permit them to travel on that flight, and to travel next morning after sleeping in the airport would have been outside the contemplation of both passenger and airline when the contract was made.

If the airline can send passengers on a flight the next day and not be in breach, where will it stop? What about if you turn up for a flight and the airline says, sleep two nights in the airport and we'll send you on another flight two days later?

If a prudent business decision requires an airline to leave two passengers, they just need to compensate those 2.

Its too simple not to be understood

Last edited by AirlinesMustPay; Oct 4, 2009 at 5:56 AM.
  #25  
Old Oct 4, 2009, 6:41 AM
PHXFlyer PHXFlyer is offline
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Originally Posted by AirlinesMustPay View Post
Just what planet are you guys living on? Surely not planet earth. And Surely not in America. Because no one on this planet will consider that it was reasonable for a passenger to overnight in an airport with a baby. But baby aside, If a passenger has a ticket to travel in the evening and the airline says we will put you on another flight in the morning, that is a breach. Their contract of carriage was for a particular flight. You will find that American Courts will dismiss any argument that the contract is not for any particular time. based on that written contract of carriage, unless that writing was brought specifically by the airline or its agent to the attention of the passenger. If the 122 passengers were told that their flight was leaving at 6 in the morning instead of the evening before, can you imagine the uproar in the airport. And because it was just the 2 it becomes OK.? I have kept on saying, the airline makes its decision who to fly and who to leave behind. And if they chose to fly the 122 on time and leave the 2 behind, that's a prudent business decision. It is prudent because they leave only 2 aggrieved passengers and have 122 flying on time. The airline is definitely in breach of contract with these two. I cannot understand why anyone would think that it is acceptable to offer passengers a flight the next morning, and this is not a breach of contract.

What about if passengers turn up next morning for a flight that left the evening before, will the airline honour their ticket? If the passenger has an obligation to show up for a particular flight at a particular time, then the airline has a reciprocal obligation to permit them to travel on that flight, and to travel next morning after sleeping in the airport would have been outside the contemplation of both passenger and airline when the contract was made.

If the airline can send passengers on a flight the next day and not be in breach, where will it stop? What about if you turn up for a flight and the airline says, sleep two nights in the airport and we'll send you on another flight two days later?

If a prudent business decision requires an airline to leave two passengers, they just need to compensate those 2.

Its too simple not to be understood
You're really grasping at straws now to "prove your point." You are citing a case from 1968. The internet did not exist. Mainframe airline reservation systems were still in their infancy. Most, if not all, people purchased their tickets through travel agencies. Travel by air was also so expensive at the time it precluded many people from traveling by air simply because it wasn't affordable.

Now all of the information regarding contracts of carriage, fare rules, etc. are accessible on the airlines' websites. If one chooses not to read them and then experiences a delay or cancellation due to weather, ATC, or any other force majeure reason covered in the contract and is then informed that they will not receive a free meal or hotel they should not cry foul. They used the internet to buy the tickets they should have taken the time to read the terms and conditions if they really wanted to know what to expect. Trouble is that air travel is so relatively inexpensive many don't consider it a major purchase. The same people that will read every clause in a contract when buying a home or car will lay out hundreds or even thousands of dollars for an airline ticket without bothering to read anything. Caveat emptor, let the buyer beware.

Without rehashing all of the legalese you have tried, unsuccessfully, to muddy the waters of this situation we can break it down very simply. The airline has no obligation to provide food and shelter (other than the airport terminal if the passenger chooses) if the delay is due to ATC (controlled by the US government) or weather (controlled by mother nature, God, or whoever/whatever you attribute it to). The airline offered re-accommodation on the next available flight which just so happened to be the next morning. The passenger (OP) when given that option without a free hotel decided to book her own flight that night on another airline. She has said she wanted special consideration (in other words wanted rules broken) since she was traveling with a small child. She admittedly was traveling with insufficient funds or supplies to adequately provide for the needs of the child. She also, admittedly, knows that connecting in Philadelphia can be problematic at times yet booked an itinerary with such a close connection that a relatively minor delay caused her to miss her connecting flight.

Was it the airlines fault that she had no money for a hotel nor sufficient food for her child? No. Was it the airline's fault that she knowingly booked a ticket with such a short connection time that a minor delay to her inbound flight would cause a mis-connect. No. The OP even stated that she was relying on the possibility that her connecting flight would be late as well. The gamble didn't work. I checked online and there are two flights out of State College that are offered which connect to that last flight of the day to Jacksonville. The first leaves State College around 2PM and there is a layover in Philadelphia of just over three hours. The second leaves just after 4 PM and has a layover of about one hour and ten minutes. Of course the flight is closed to boarding 15 minutes before the scheduled departure time so it really only gives one only 55 minutes plus you have to subtract the time it takes to deplane, walk to the connecting gate, etc. With a youngster in tow why would you book that second option? Even if the flight had been on time they would have been rushed to make the connecting flight.

The OP shouldn't expect nor is she going to get her money back for the Southwest tickets. As I have suggested before she should ask for the remaining value of the unused tickets to be issued as a voucher. US Airways is under no obligation to do so but from a customer service standpoint it might be the right thing to do to have a chance at repeat business. Additionally if she is on this website bashing US Airways you can bet she's been telling all her friends and family about it too. A little goodwill could go a long way for the airline in terms of it's image.
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